‘Sticky Weeds’ – A gardeners Nightmare, a Herbalist’s dream

The first hint that a plant is good for you, is if it’s defense mechanisms are good at making you want to leave it alone! Sadly most gardeners feel removing said plants is better then using their qualities, creating a large gap in knowledge which separates your average gardener from a herbalist, IE, those who want it to look pretty, vs those who can live off the land.

Take for example Echinacea, most of us know it is an immune boosting plant, however, if you’ve tried harvesting one, you know you’ll need gloves for the spines and heavy duty to snips to break up the spiny flower once dried.

As per a thread on this site, ‘Sticky Weeds’ , bedstraw or its official name Galium Aparine should be removed asap as it will spread and cause havoc. Here’s a thought, you about you learn how to control it and use the benefits of the plant, instead of throwing out the baby with the bath water? Like most ‘weeds’ we’ve been told to remove, this ‘annoyance’ holds medicinal properties. Galium Aparine is a natural cancer fighter, yet whens the last time you’ve seen this as an ingredient?

Do yourself a favor, find out what’s growing in your yard, and see if it will help you before removing it! And in doing so, you’ll more then likely uncover a wealth of knowledge that will help you for years to come 🙂 The earth gives us what we need, let’s use it!

Carrot Cake Tea

Ingredients:

Other Items Required:

  1. Mortar & Pestle
  2. Mixing Bowl
  3. Loose Leaf Tea Ball or French Press, etc

Preparation

  1. Gather Ingredients
  2. Using a mortar and pestle grind each ingredient then put in mixing bowl
  3. Mix thoroughly
  4. Test out! – For every cup of water, use half a tablespoon of tea mix

Ready in 15 minutes

Serves 10-13 people

Tips

When grinding ingredients, take care not to grind too fine as it will leave a layer of silt in the bottom of your tea cup.

Note: Orange Mint has been suggested as a substitute for Orange Peel, however I have yet to test this yet.

Step By Step Guide with Tips!

What’s in Your Tea? – Orange Peel

When sourcing your orange peels, be aware that they pick up pesticides! After hearing about major tea companies crafting teas with unacceptable pesticide levels, and orange peko being the top, I delved into to check if there is any way to retain the flavor while eliminating the chemical – No verified safe methods have been found.

If you still choose to use orange peel in your tea, it is suggested to use ‘organic’, however, organic is just a title, and the source should be researched.

As I do grow a lot of my own tea ingredients, someday I see myself growing a little orange tree, but for now, I’ll be limiting the amount of teas I make with this item, as it’s hard to source safely.

Sumac

This plant grows in my backyard in Vernon, British Columbia. I started researching what uses it had, and to my surprise, I found out that there are more then just a poisonous Sumac! (As you can see, my yard can be a bit of a desert, so this is not the kind that grows in a marsh.)

The benefits of Sumac have a wide range-from anti-fibrogenic, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antimicrobial, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antithrombin, antitumorigenic, antiviral, cytotoxic, hypoglycaemic, leukopaenic and atheroprotective effect, strong in anticarcinogenic Tannins, and has a potent antioxidant which protects humans against oxidative DNA-damage. It also has promising Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic properties, which have yet to be tested on humans.(Reference)

The leaves, flowers, bark and roots all have their own properties too!

  • Sumac Leaves – Infusion of sumac leaves is used for treating asthama, diarrhea and stomach disorders. A poultice of sumac leaves is used to treat skin rash, sore gums and sore lips.
  • Sumac flowers – Decoction of sumac flowers used to treat flatulence, indigestion, eye wash
  • Sumac bark and roots – Infusion used as tonic, treat fever, increase breast milk in feeding mothers, treat hemorrhoids
  • Sumac berries – Decoction of sumac berries used to treat diabetes, constipation, women disorders, coolant, bed wetting, other bladder disorders, Treat cough, asthma, fever, diabetes, ulcer, pain

(Reference)

I myself have been harvesting the berries and making wine, then I take the crushed berries, dry them out, and am left with a delicious lemon-berry tea!

I hope you find this information beneficial, please let me know in the comments your experiences with this plant.

On a side note, keep checking my FB Store as I hope to have some sumac tea available, though it will be in limited quantities!